Immediately following World War II, the Japanese brides of Australian servicemen were precluded from entry to their husbands’ home country under the White Australia Policy. Servicemen, their families and members of the general community lobbied to allow the wives and children of servicemen into the country, citing the residence of Asian war brides of their citizens in the USA, United Kingdom and Canada. From 1952, Japanese brides of Australian servicemen were permitted to enter Australia, initially with 5 year visas. There were a still a number of conditions that had to be met for a Japanese bride to be allowed entry. The husband must be able to prove that he had a suitable home and could provide for his wife. The bride must supply x-rays and medical certificates and pass character and security checks to which most applicants for long-term residency were subject. Proof had to be supplied that the marriage took place legally and according to Christian rites. The wife could bring her children, but no other relatives. From 1953, Japanese fiancées of Australian servicemen could also travel to Australia. They were issued with 3 month visas; the couple had to marry within this time for the bride to qualify for the same 5 year residency visa that other Japanese brides received. These documents and images show part of the journey of four Japanese brides of Australian servicemen – Cherry Parker (the first Japanese bride to be allowed to migrate to Australia), Yoshino Wood, Teruko Nelson and Jane Sadako Morris.

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